Tag Archives: Family

Friendship, Relationship, Love

Gary and Sassy cuddling together on a bench. photo taken from behind with a lighthouse off to the left.

I never thought i’d end up with Gary, in fact, neither of us ever thought it would happen…

We met at University when he joined in 2012, both my Uni housemates met him on nights out during Freshers week, at separate times, and before long he joined our friendship group.

He and I clicked straight away, and it was nice to have another male within the group. Gary wasn’t like a lot of the other Freshers, he wasn’t the biggest party goer and was mature for his age, which I think is why our friendship blossomed and the group felt so relaxed around him.

We hung out, texted, stayed at each others houses and gave each other relationship/ dating advice, it was plutonic. Our friends all joked and said if we ever lived together, we would get together, but we laughed it off and ignored their comments; we didn’t see each other like that.

And this is where the story gets interesting…

It was my housemates’ last year at Uni (it would have been mine too, but that is for another story), our lease was due to run out and I was frantically searching for a place to live as a singular student that I could afford, with no luck whatsoever, Gary and 3 of my other Uni friends had all agreed I could stay at theirs until I found a place, it’ll only be about a week I said, so i’ll be out of your hair in no time!

Gary and Sassy both laughing. Sassy with her hands covering her face and Gary stood behind her grinning

3 months went by before I finally found somewhere ! Needless to say Gary and I grew closer, spending more time together: hanging out, eating together, and because of my sight loss he even helped me go shopping. Being blind and moving to a new area takes a lot of mobility and energy to get where you want to be. I was most grateful for his support, friendship and sense of humour at that time!

It literally came from nowhere, one night we were playing drinking games, and when the others had left the room he randomly just kissed me.
I was in total shock, but for the strangest reason it just felt right…

Gary and I moved in together as a couple after his student lease ran out, and we’ve been attached at the hip ever since.

He’s been my rock, confidant and my best friend for as long as i’ve known him, it’s just intensified since being together. He has been at my side through the toughest 5 years of my life, 3 of which has been as my partner.

We are a very happy family unit, spending the majority of our weekends rambling and chasing our gorgeous pup Ida!
Currently we are saving for our first house and plan to move where his family live, although, we have made a happy life four ourselves here.
I can’t wait to start the next chapter of our relationship and eventually be his Wife! ❤

sassy touching noes with Ida the guide dog

Understanding M.e. (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)

Hi, I’m Ellen! Sassy has kindly given me the opportunity to write a bit about ME, (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis), and my mum’s experience of suffering from it. I think it is so important to raise awareness and I have included some tips for anyone who wants to help somebody suffering from the illness.

In 2011 my mum was diagnosed with ME after many months of feeling very ill and numerous doctor and hospital appointments.




What is ME?

It’s not easy to define what ME is due to many different symptoms and theories as to what causes it. Some say it is a neurological disorder, others an immune dysfunction, but much research is still needed.

How ME effects my Mum:
ME effects people differently and can vary in its severity. For my mum, in addition to an overwhelming tiredness she gets body aches, pains, dizziness and nausea. And I’m talking 24/7. It’s like having bad flu every single day to the point where you can’t get out of bed.
One of the hardest things for suffers is the lack of understanding. You can look well on the surface or perhaps be having a good day but that doesn’t mean you’re cured. The next day might be a very different story. It’s much more than just feeling ‘a bit tired’ and can’t be made better by a good night’s sleep!
The stigma around ME:
Many doctors, (though not all!), don’t understand ME, probably due to not knowing the cause of it. Some can be unsympathetic and dismissive. It’s important to find a doctor who understands and supports you as this is the first step in being diagnosed and feeling better.
How to support someone who is suffering with ME:
Depending on the severity, developing ME can completely change your life, in some cases leaving you bed ridden. If you know someone suffering here are some ways you can help:
• Don’t tell them that they just need ‘a good night sleep’ or to take ‘a refreshing walk in the countryside’ to feel better. The only way to manage ME is to allow your body to rest and pace your activities every day.
• My mum can’t easily plan ahead as she never knows whether she will be having a good or bad day so be flexible and understanding. Plans may need to be adapted to include less walking for example.
• Encourage them to take time out each day to rest. This is the main way my mum can manage her illness. If it means having a Spanish style siesta each day, go for it! And don’t let them feel guilty for missing out on things!
• Offer to help with the more mundane life chores e.g cleaning/walking the dog. It means they can save more energy for the fun things!
But it’s not all bad news! When first diagnosed my mum couldn’t even walk from her bedroom to the kitchen and had to spend months in bed. But now she leads a normal yet slower paced life by building in time each day to rest! Most people improve over time and are even cured after 5-10 years. It’s all about balance and staying positive!
In a funny way I think my mums ME has actually bought some positives to her life. She takes a lot more time for herself and has rediscovered hobbies and interests that she’d given up during the usual frenetic pace of life. Now I’m older I look back and realise how hard it must have been, even at her worst she was always there to pick me up from school and cook me dinner and never complained about how ill she was. She’s an amazing mum!
If you have any questions or would like to find out more, come and say hi at www.ohhelloellen.com or on Twitter




The Joys of A&E

Gary and I headed off to A&E on Friday morning as previously discussed by the Doctors and ourselves in Malta.
We are extremely grateful to our friends for picking us up from the airport, and then kindly carrying me to the sofa! As I had been in a foreign hospital I had no wheelchair or crutches to aid me; only the people around me!

Thankfully A&e wasn’t too packed, so we didn’t have to wait too long to be seen. I was given a set of crutches and an appointment to the fracture clinic for Monday morning to discuss surgery.

And we were sent on our merry way.

*****
Around 5 AM Sunday morning I woke up in considerable pain, my leg felt like it was having the life squeezed out of it, I took some painkillers and by 06:30 things hadn’t improved, I was starting to seriously worry; I had no DVT injection since Thursday and I was beginning to worry there might be something sinister going on.

(Fondaparinux injection is used to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT; a blood clot, usually in the leg. It is given to those who have had a recent leg operation or have severely restricted movement in the legs from an accident.)
Gary and I went straight to A&E; I wasn’t seen by a doctor until 10:00.

I explained everything from my accident, handing over my discharge letter along with x-ray and CT scan, to the fracture clinic appointment, to the pain I was feeling, the Doctor did all the checks and said that I did have circulation flowing and there wasn’t anything to be concerned about. It wasn’t until I stressed that this pain had become increasingly worse daily that he decided to keep me monitored until I could speak to an orthopaedic doctor.
Gary and I made it clear that I was blind, but I don’t think this was passed onto the HCA taking my OBs; he just stood their silently waiting for me to hold my arm out and then finger so he could take my blood pressure and pulse…
Regardless of my sight loss I thought it was almost rude that he came into the cubicle without a word, moved about quietly and then expected to take my OBs in silence and stalk off again… There has been a change in the law that people with extra needs who attend NHS centres should be given notes/ leaflets/ medical information in a format preferred by the patient. So for me that would be; verbal communication as to who they are, what they are doing in the room, talking openly about my care, and any medical information to be given to me via email.
This was never discussed with me, but as it wasn’t exactly high on my priority list I decided not to mention it.

When my 4 hours in A&E were up; a nurse explained that I had filled my quota of A&E hours and I had to go elsewhere for monitoring and waiting to see the Doctor in charge of Orthopaedics.
Discussing with the nurse as she moved us elsewhere in the hospital it’s clear that the medical professionals are aggravated by the government putting this in place.
If I were to stay longer than my quota she would get it in the neck from her bosses!
How ridiculous is it that the government are more bothered about number crunching than patients and their welfare!

My family and I were put on a ward and told that they couldn’t give us a time, but the Doctor would be with us when he could.
We laughed and joked, and waited around for at least an hour and half before we began getting impatient. My Dad and Gary were giving us hangry eyes; so Mother and i sent them off to make us some breakfast sandwiches 🙂
Thankfully for us Gary and I live around the corner from the hospital so it was easy enough for Gary and Dad to pop home, make brunch and bring it back.
Sausage and bacon sandwiches with a cup of tea was just what we all needed! Thinking back now, it was very tasty and I was extremely grateful to the boys, even if it was more for their benefit than either mine or my Mum’s 😉

We waited for at least another hour before my Mother decided to go and investigate as to what was going on, she came across a bunch of nurses just sitting on their phones not doing any work!
Upon enquiring she was given an “we don’t know what’s going on”comment.
Mother didn’t take no for an answer and eventually we were told that the Doctor we were waiting on was in surgery and would see us when he was out…
Although annoying that we hadn’t been given this information before, at least we finally knew what all the waiting around was for!

Eventually we saw the Doctor. From the x-rays he had seen the fracture was severe and definitely needed surgery, but as the hospital couldn’t access the CT scans that i had brought over with me from Malta, he couldn’t make an informed decision of how to repair the leg properly.

CT scan give for more detailed information than an x-ray. I was told that I could possibly have the surgery as early as the next morning, so I was to prepare myself by eating and drinking nothing after midnight and I would get a phone call in the morning to let me know if I would be having surgery.
It was a long day; we didn’t leave the hospital until around 14:30 but at least we had cut out the middle man of going through this all the following day at the fracture clinic.:)
** * * *
I hope you haven’t had to attend A&e, but if you have, what were your experiences with it?



Disability Q&A #8 Emily Davison

Welcome back to my #Disability Q&A series! 🙂

Today’s interview is brought to you by the lovely Emily Davison, before I started blogging I had come across her YouTube channel and loved what she had to say. She has pazazz and an obvious love for fashion and beauty.
When I started this Disability Q&A I knew from the get go I wanted to have her on board! So I was extremely happy when she agreed to participate! 🙂

Without sounding too much like a fan girl i’l hand you over to the lady herself…
Tell me about yourself:
Hello i’m Emily Davison, i’m 21
and I live in London, England. I’m a

MA Student, Journalist, Public Speaker, Podcast Presenter and Writer.
I love writing, reading, swimming, astronomy, blogging and nature photography.

Now we know the basics, can we learn a bit more about you?

I’m just your average kind of girl, I’m at University studying for an MA in Children’s Literature. I love to write and read books,

What is the medical reason you have a disability?
I was born with a condition known as Septo Optic Dysplasia, a congenital condition which affects the endocrine system, hormone production system and in some cases, vision.

Have you had your Visual impairment / disability from birth?
I have, yes.

Which terminology do you prefer: Partially Sighted, Visually Impaired, Sight Impaired, Severely Sight Impaired or Blind?

I prefer to be called Severely sight impaired.

Do you have a cane, Guide Dog or neither?
I have both, but my guide dog is my number one choice of course!

If you could extinguish your disability, would you? – If not, please explain why.
I wouldn’t, it’s how nature intended me to be. I was born with my disability so I don’t know life any other way. I’ve grown to accept the person I am, disability included and I couldn’t imagine life without it.

For those who do not know much about your VI what can you see?
I have no vision in my right eye and restricted vision in my left. I have only central vision in my left eye and can only see things that are relatively close by.

How has your disability effected you?
Its more a physical kind of thing, it affects my sight as well as my immune system and I suffer with low blood sugar. So it can be very debilitating at times, but it can sometimes affect me mentally in so far that in the passed I have suffered with Depression and Anorexia as a result of it.

Do you think your disability has made you who you are today?

Absolutely, my disability has taught me so many things about who I am as a person, what I can do, my strengths and how to overcome adversity.
Its taught me to embrace diversity and not to judge people for who they are and the choices they make.
It’s taught me to try and not judge a book by its cover and remember that everyone is going through their own battles.
Its enabled me to look deep inside myself and find the strength I need to get through each day and grow as a person.
Its shown me where my passion lies and what my strengths are, I now know that I want to be an author writing books with characters that represent people with disabilities. It’s shown me that I can channel the power of words to help others like I do with my blogs and articles.
Its taught me to embrace myself for the person I am.

Is there a particular question you get asked often because of your disability? If so, please explain below.

“Are you training that guide dog?”

I get asked this a lot and I think it’s due to the fact that I am a confident person in the way I walk and act. It’s as if people cant accept the idea that someone with a guide dog can also be a confident and outgoing individual. And so anyone who is must therefore be a guide dog trainer.

What are the positives of having a disability?

The humor, being a person with a disability is very comical at times. You get into some very interesting conversations with people and some awkward situations and even though some can be utterly cringe worthy. A lot can be used as some great stories at parties.

It brings me closer to my friends and family because I do a lot of things with them or when I need help with certain things.

The perks, getting discounts on tickets to events, theatres and cinemas, I mean who doesn’t want to get into an event for cheaper?

The people I meet, I get to meet so many amazing people through networking with disability charities and organizations as well as online. I’ve met so many incredible people who have such amazing outlooks on life and stories to tell and that I am truly grateful for.

What are the negatives of having a disability?

When it can hinder the things you want to do or make it that little bit harder. Like when I have to plan a route to a venue based on which tube stations are accessible, that can be frustrating.

Having to deal with remarks about what I can and cannot do and having to deal with negative comments.

What would you say is a difficulty for you being VI / disabled?

People judging you, the hardest part about being disabled I would say is having to hear people’s remarks about your disability and how you should be because of it. It’s so difficult to deal with people who believe that being disabled means you cannot have a quality of life or do anything for yourself. I receive so many remarks from people like “you don’t look blind” or “you don’t seem disabled.” Or when I read comments on my YouTube channel from people who argue that I cannot be visually impaired and that I must be lying because according to their opinion people with sight loss cannot look attractive, wear lipstick or adorn nice clothing.

I can deal with the personal struggles that my disability pits against me, but it’s harder to cope with the stigma that surrounds having a disability that society can create.

As a person with a disability, what are the things you face on a daily / weekly basis that frustrate you?

I think the issues that frustrate me most are when I’m traveling and using public transport. I become most frustrated when I’m on a bus and there’s not enough space for my guide dog. I also find it frustrating when I’m using tubes and other services and the stations are not accessible, such as when they do not have lifts or stairs that I can access.
Using transport, as a disabled person can be extremely stressful at times and I think that is the most challenging aspect, for me, about living with a disability.

Are there any tips or tricks you use in daily life you’d like to pass on to another VI/ disabled person?

There are plenty! I’d need a year to simply write down and divulge my little tricks and tips. But, here are a few.

Organize your clothes in order of the color spectrum, in order of red all the way down to violet. Make sure you have a system to organize your clothes so that you know where everything is and you can plan outfits easier.

With makeup, try and make your life easier by doing little things to help like tinting your eyelashes and threading and tinting your eyebrows. If you struggle to apply brow products or to get the shape of your brows, use stencils, which can be bought for a few pounds on eBay. They are honestly a real life saver when it comes to brows.

If you cant see the print of something like on a package, simply take a photo of it on your iPhone and zoom in on it to see it. Its simply, quick and easy.

Do you use Assistive technology in your daily living?
I use all Apple technology including an iPad, iPhone and a Macbook. I love Apple technology because it has all the accessibility features built in and you can easily customize them to your needs and preferences.
But, I also use an application on my Mac called Claro Read which can read text to me and scan documents into accessible formats such as PDFs and Word documents.
I use a Snow electronic magnifier to read print and magazines.
In the kitchen I use a talking microwave, talking scales, talking jug and liquid level indicator.
I also use the Kindle App, which can be made accessible on an iPhone with the Voiceover features.

What piece of advice would you give to someone newly diagnosed? Or going through a deterioration in vision / or mobility?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help, asking for help is a human need and we all have to at some point or another, disabled or not.
But, the other important thing to remember is to keep an open mind, take on board all the advice you are given and the support you are offered. Do as much as you can to enrich your life and take on whatever opportunities you can to move forward and move on.

Any advice you’d like to give to a person with sight / no disabilities?

Don’t judge a book by its cover. Always keep an open mind and remember that behind each person lies a story. Until we know that story we can never begin to presume anything about who they are.

Did you seek out any specialist services / charities to help you and your family deal with your situation?

When I was 6 I began to use Blind Children UK and RNIB Talking Book Catalogue to access books and to read independently. I also used the RNIB and their services including their helpline and products throughout my school years and still do to this day. I also used the RNIB helpline for advice when applying for DSA and University related advice. When I was 17 I contacted Guide Dogs to apply for a guide dog and when I was 18 I was given a beautiful little four-legged friend by the name of Unity who is my eyes, my confidence and my freedom.

Where can people find you out in the world?
Blog: fashioneyesta.com
YouTube: youtube.com/user/fashioney…
Second YouTube Channel: youtube.com/channel/UCX-t0…
FaceBook: facebook.com/Fashioneyesta
Twitter: twitter.com/DavisonEm
Instagram: instagram.com/fashioneyesta2…
Pintrest: pinterest.com/emilykd94/
Audioboom: audioboom.com/fashioneyesta
Tumblr: fashioneyesta.tumblr.com
Email: fashioneyesta@gmail.com

TtT




Thank you so much Emily! I’m blown away by how much information you’ve shared with us today! I am sure many of us will be taking away a lot of your useful tips to help keep our lives running that bit smoother!
Thank you also for sharing some of your darker times, as you said everyone is human and we all should ask or at least accept help now and again! 🙂

Please don’t forget to follow her links, and why not share the love? Leave her a comment, we would both appreciate it!

If you, or anyone you know, would like to take part in my Campaign, do not hesitate to contact me on the following:
Email:SassysWorld6@gmail.com
Twitter
Facebook

If you enjoyed this interview why not check out the others in the series so far?
Interview 1
Interview 2
Interview 3
Interview 4
Interview 5
Interview 6
Interview 7




Happy diaries #10

Hello Diary!

I am absolutely buzzing! I have so many great things to tell you!

I went to a meeting this week and was part of helping to make digital more inclusive for the blind and visually impaired! Especially for those who like me use screen readers!
I can’t tell you too much more at the moment but it’s being improved, and developing further.
But it certainly looks like there are positive things up on the horizon! 🙂

I only went and made the finals of the prestigious BritMums blogging awards!! Oh my I am so freaking excited!! I swear I didn’t think I was going to be made a finalist! There are too many amazing bloggers in my category and they really did deserve to be there! I woke up to lots of twitter and Whatsapp messages congratulating me!
I did scream just a little bit! 😉

I wrote my I’m Going To #BML16 post and have RSVP’d for the welcome drinks on Friday 24th, so if you’re going give me a shout!
I found out that I am on the 1st page of Google! If you type in Thinking Out Loud, you’ll see my little blog along side Ed Sheerans’ famous song; how incredible is that?!
It’s quite an honour really, especially as it is so hard to get onto Google as it is; nevermind the front page! He is one of my favourite artists!

Currently I’m at Gary’s family for the Bank Holiday weekend, it’s been absolutely lovely! I had my first ever Indian head massage; it was absolutely glorious!
We also went out for dinner and drinks with everyone which was also lovely.
We went to a food and drink festival type thing, where we tried a tornado potato; essentially its a thinly sliced potato wrapped round a stick and deep fried, it reminded me of crisps.Gary and I shared a white chocolate doughnut, pretty tasty, but I couldn’t eat a whole one.
And probably the best bit was going to the cheese stand and getting to taste random flavours; curry cheese being one of them. Still not sure what I think of it, it was certainly strange. We did buy Chilli Dutch Edam, very yummy! I was good and didn’t have any alcohol!

We also had a BBQ in the sun, it wasn’t as warm as the rest of the weekend but it was great. To spend it with the whole family 🙂

Gratitude List

I have to thank my fantastic readers, without them voting for me in the BiBs, I wouldn’t be so ecstatic and grinning like a loon all week 🙂
Family – again I am so grateful for your support, giving me support, feedback and encouragement with this blog, thank you again Francis for rallying for me, I love you so much!
* Gary – Where would I be without you my love? You encouraged me to set up this blog, give me something to focus on and drag me out of my depression, but more than that you have been my rock throughout this journey; my technical support, my devils advocate, and mocking me when I act like a loon for getting where I am with my little blog!
Friends – from home, Uni and online you have also supported me, not just on my blogging experience but in life in general. Big love to Life Of A Blind Girl, you are such a gem, and I look forward to finally meeting you face-to-face over the Summer!!

The amazingTribe! Ladies, I am so grateful to have found you; you’ve made my blogging journey all the more special, and even helped me find perspective when I couldn’t find it myself! The sad part is I can’t even thank you properly because you aren’t all coming to #BML which I am beyond gutted about! Lots of hugs, cake and alcohol shall be consumed!

Sunshine – you are my literal and metaphorical ray of light, when you come out to play life just seems brighter somehow!
* Music- you’ve helped me through when i’ve had my down moments this week But more often. When I’m in the best mood, music picks me up further and makes me feel like i’m on cloud 9

So that’s it my Diary!
I can say it’s probably been one of the best weeks of my life!

Let’s hope the positive mood keeps me going throughout next week! 🙁

Until next time!

Happy Diaries #8

Hello Diary,

I think things are slowly getting back on track, I can’t promise anything but looking into mindfulness and trying to think positively has definitely helped a lot this week!

I’ve just come back from a lovely weekend away in the East Midlands visiting Gary’s family. It was so lovely to see everyone again. I can’t believe how Big my niece is! And her speech is coming along fantastically!
It’s amazing how quickly a little one develops when you don’t see them for a couple of months! 🙂

Thankfully the weather stayed warm and dry for the whole weekend, so that put a smile on everyone’s faces 🙂

This weekend in general has been a much more positive one, and i’m glad it ended on an even happier note 🙂

Gratitude List:

Family: seeing Gary’s family is always full of love and laughter, and i’m so lucky to be part of such a gorgeous family
* Tribesters: They have supported me a lot this week, whether it be emotionally or on a blogging level! Massive shout out to the beautiful Mummy In A Tu Tu. Honestly, I don’t know how I, or my blog, survived before now!!
* Blogging friends: I’ve been making new, and better friends with more wonderful people within the blogging community! Again, they have supported me on a friendship level, but also to boost my blog, and I too return the favor (just putting that out there encase I was seen as a taker!).
Food: Gary’s Mum made a delicious curry on Friday night, I had a yummy pizza on Saturday and today we went out for a carvery… I love food, not sure if that is made abundantly clear in everyone o my Happy Diaries posts!! 😉
I’m thankful I have had a much better week, just keep swimming 😉
Until next week!




❤️ If you enjoy my ramblings, and think for one crazy second, that somehow I deserve to become a finalist in the prestigious Brilliance In Blogging Awards (BiBs) I would love your vote!
Simply click this button below and it will take you straight there!
All you need to do is put:
Your Name
Your Email Address
Thinking Out Loud, in the category of INSPIRE
Please and thank you.
you wonderful human being! ❤️

BritMums

Disability Q&A Interview #4 Meagan Houle

Welcome back to my disability Q&A series where I interview people from around the world about their disabilities, and how they cope in daily life and overcome any struggles they may face.

Today’s interview is brought to you by Meagan, I stumbled across her Twitter page, a while ago, noticed she had a blog also, and got absorbed reading it she too blogs about visual impairment, disabilities and challenging stereotypes. So I thought who better to ask to join my campaign?

Now I hand you over to Meagan…
.

tell me about yourself?

My name is Meagan Houle, and I hail from the Great White North
(Alberta, more specifically). I’m a soon-to-be graduate of MacEwan
University, working on a Professional Communications degree. I’m
finally 21, so can now raise a glass anywhere I’d like! It’s terribly
exciting.
What hobbies do you have?
Language is one of my greatest loves, so I’m always reading, editing,
reviewing, or writing. Crowds don’t scare me, so I like to get up in
front of them and either speak or sing. Research is another great
love, so I’m always chasing some elusive answer or other.
Now we know the basics, can we learn a bit more about you?

What is the medical reason you have a disability?
My eye condition is Leber’s Congenital amaurosis, but its friends call
it LCA. It’s a rare genetic disorder that affects patients in varied
ways. Some may be completely blind, while others, like me, have light
and colour perception. The particular form I have is literally one in
a million, so I get to be special in at least one way. You might say I
won the genetic lottery.
Have you had your Visual impairment / disability from birth?
Yes. What little vision I was born with is declining now, but I’ve
always been visually impaired.

Which terminology do you prefer: Partially Sighted, Visually Impaired, Sight
Impaired, Severely Sight Impaired or Blind?I tend to favour “blind” because it’s such an easy, uncomplicated
catch-all, and because I’m not sensitive about perfect accuracy. If
we’re being technical, though, “visually impaired” suits me best as I
do have a tiny amount of vision, though not enough to give me any real
perks! (Thanks, universe.)
Do you have a cane, Guide Dog or neither?
Oh, I’m a lover of the long white stick, for the moment at least.
If you could extinguish your disability, would you? – If not, please explain
why.
It’s a complex issue, but the short answer is, maybe. If there was a
medically low-risk cure available I might consider it, but only if
rehabilitation services were being offered afterword. I can’t imagine
suddenly being able to see with no one to help me process the new
information my brain was receiving. I’m not exactly happy to be
disabled, but I’ve grown used to living this way and the thought of
such a foundation-shattering change makes me shiver a little. For me,
it’s not a matter of snapping my fingers and making my problems go
away; it’s far more nuanced than that.
For those who do not know much about your VI what can you see?
I can’t properly answer this question, because I have no idea what
seeing normally would be like. I have no frame of reference. I can
tell you that I can see light and colour, though my colour perception
is fading as LCA continues to limit my peripheral vision. I can’t do
any of the useful stuff, though. I like to joke that I’m functionally
blind, for the most part. I can’t read print or recognize faces or
drive. I read braille, and use screen readers, and travel with a cane.
How has your disability effected you?
*Socially
It’s tough to say how exactly blindness has affected me socially,
because I’ve never been any other way. I will say that, within the
bounds of my family, it made very little difference. Certainly, my
cousins and sister had to slow down a little when playing tag or
hide-and-seek, but generally I felt like one of them in the ways that
mattered. School was a different story. I was lucky for the most part:
I wasn’t usually bullied, and when I was, it often involved some kid
running around me in circles chanting “You’re blind!” over and over.
(Really? I had no idea!) I was, however, ignored by almost everyone,
even the nice kids. I eventually made a few cherished friends, and I
graduated with a healthy social life.
Dating was harder, not least because I was introverted and shy. I
couldn’t exactly fall for someone I’d hardly spoken to because looks
were mostly irrelevant. I also found it difficult to exchange those
loaded glances you’re supposed to send across the room to the
potential new love interest. I met my fiance online (though not on a
dating site), so I haven’t dated in several years.
Now, I don’t find it much of a challenge to make friends and
socialize. It takes people some time to warm up to me, but once I
prove to be fairly normal, I find it simple enough to join groups for
work and school. While I do have a large group of blind friends and
acquaintances, I get along equally well with sighted people.
*physically
LCA is believed to be capable of causing all manner of delightful
things, like organ damage unrelated to the eyes, but so far I’ve been
spared. Blindness itself is not an overly physical disability, in that
you can still move uninhibited for the most part. With blindness, it’s
the external environment that’s more worrisome. I’ve sustained more
than a few minor and moderate injuries courtesy of a post I couldn’t
see or a wall I forgot about entirely. I actually gave myself a minor
concussion once via a support pole while playing a spirited game of
tag. I did forget which grade I was in and the names of my cats, but
what’s a knock on the head here and there for a life of carefree play,
right?

*Mentally
This can tie into the social aspects, I think, so it’s a hard question
to answer on its own. One of the most important parts of a human’s
general development is their relationship to the outside world, and
since I grew up in a rural community packed with sighted people, I had
no geographically close friends who understood me or my particular
struggles. The internet, when it finally came along, broadened my
horizons enormously, but as a child and young teenager, parts of my
life were quite distinct from those around me and I had no idea if I
was doing everything right. Any exclusionary trait is going to
interfere with mental development, so I doubt I could even begin to
quantify the ways blindness shaped mine. I was sometimes put in
separate classes, though not often as I went to public school. I was
excluded from many activities, and placed in groups with people who
had cognitive disabilities (the reasoning being that disabled people
should all be lumped in together, even when they have nothing in
common at all). I really think my small but loyal group of sighted
friends saved my sanity while I was growing up.
Now, I’m reasonably well-adjusted, so I doubt blindness is quite as
problematic for me mentally as it used to be.

Do you think your disability has made you who you are today?
I imagine it’s impossible to have a disability like blindness and
remain entirely unaffected by it. My identity is made up of so many
components of my life, and blindness is an undeniably important part
of that. Maybe I’d be more inclined toward sports if I could see,
though there are many blind athletes, so that’s unlikely. Maybe I’d be
more interested in fashion, though again, there are many
fashion-conscious blind people, so that seems unlikely, too. Maybe I
wouldn’t be as introverted or bookish; maybe I wouldn’t be as
interested in music; maybe I wouldn’t be as passionate about diversity
and social justice. Still, introversion, musicianship, and a passion
for social justice are fairly common, so I’m not convinced blindness
has made me who I am, from the ground up. It would be naive to claim
it hasn’t shaped me at all, though. Blindness has a habit of
encouraging certain traits while minimizing others. Music an books are
blind-friendly, so it’s natural that I would gravitate toward them. It
makes sense that I’d be passionate about diversity, as I’m a diverse
individual by default.
If I had to cite one positive, disability-related aspect of my
identity, I suppose it would have to be a certain empathy toward any
and all struggles, whether I understand them or not. I’m quicker to
get involved on behalf of someone else, and much more likely to
consider a new discrimination case carefully before making judgements
about how it might be dealt with. Disability has, in short, reminded
me on a regular basis that life is unfair. It has made me want to make
it a little fairer.

Is there a particular question you get asked often because of your
disability? If so, please explain below.
There are too many to name! I suppose I’m most often asked how I
manage living with blindness. I don’t have a satisfactory answer to
this, so I just tell people that necessity is very persuasive. If
you’re given a burden and told you must either bear it or not exist at
all, it’s not a hard choice to make. This doesn’t mean I don’t
struggle, and this doesn’t mean I necessarily enjoy being disabled,
but it does mean that I’m forced to handle it, so I do. Most days,
it’s not even on my mind much. >
What are the positives of having a disability?
I’d say the positive I most value is that I get to see the best of
people. I definitely get to see the worst of people, too, when they
discriminate against me or tell me I’m just a drag on resources and
ought to go home to my mother. I get to meet people while they’re
offering an providing assistance, asking how they can get involved in
associated causes, and generally trying to understand me. So many
strangers have crossed my path because they wanted to know how they
could improve the lives of others. It’s a privilege to interact with
so many who seek education and champion diversity for all people, not
just themselves. These are the type of people who make great lifelong
friends.
What are the negatives of having a disability?
There are a few too many to discuss properly here. The obvious ones
are social exclusion, chronic unemployment, accessibility barriers,
gaps in understanding, lowered educational an professional standards,
bullying and bigotry, etc. Even the most successful, functional
disabled people can’t escape at least a few of these. You just learn
how to deal with them. We have all the same issues as every other
humans; we just have a few extra ones, too.

What would you say is a difficulty for you being VI / disabled?
At the moment, my most immediate difficulty is finding gainful
employment. I’m on the job hunt, and I’m routinely bumping up against
barriers that wouldn’t exist for a sighted person with my
qualifications and skills. I’ll be looking at the ideal job,
daydreaming about the interview, only to find a few duties associated
with video editing or some other skill I just can’t learn to a high
enough standard. Then there’s the issue of disclosure: I no longer
disclose blindness on application forms, because it’s the quickest way
to guarantee that my resume will end up in the recycling bin and my
calls will go unreturned. More than once, a hiring manager has become
excited about me as a candidate, only to go silent when they realize
I’m blind. Suddenly, the position has been filled, or they no longer
need anyone at all. So, interviews are stressful because I’m
anticipating their reactions to me. I know I’ll be defending the
qualifications a sighted person would simply be assumed to have. When
sighted people point to their degree, it’s assumed they can do the job
until they prove otherwise. For me, it’s the opposite: I find myself
defending my degree, because it’s assumed I’m incompetent until I
prove otherwise. It’s highly discouraging.
As a person with a disability, what are the things you face on a daily /
weekly basis that frustrate you?
*In your home
Unless I’m very careful about organization, it’s easy to lose things,
even if I’ve only just put them down. I can spend ten minutes
searching my tiny apartment for my keys or cell phone. (Of course, I
can put this down to being a wee bit scatterbrained, as well.) Then
there are general accessibility issues, like labels I can’t read,
though I have developed labeling systems to get around that. The home
is the least frustrating environment because it’s the only one I can
control.

*outside your home
The most frustrating obstacles outside the home are usually outdoors.
While I can learn a route and travel with reasonable safety and
precision, any unexpected obstacles can really throw me off. (This is
partially because I have a cane, but it can hinder guide dog
travelers, too.)Construction zones, illegally-parked vehicles, and
snowbanks are just a few of the objects that can knock me off course
if I’m not especially familiar with the area I’m navigating. Of
course, outside the home, people are free to move objects around with
impunity. So, even if I’m organized, as soon as someone moves my
belongings around, it’s going to slow me down. This happens especially
in school and workplaces, where a huge volume of people come and go,
often touching and manipulating things I will later need to use. This
is why we can be so fussy about our own possessions, and why we hate
it when others move them.
Are there any tips or tricks you use in daily life you’d like to pass on to
another VI/ disabled person?
I don’t have a ton of handy tips and tricks that aren’t either common
knowledge or stolen from those wiser than I am. I think the single
most useful thing I can think of is the value of labels. Label
everything, even if you think you can probably remember where you’ve
put a thing. That way, if someone else comes in and shifts your stuff,
you’re not facing hours of fiddling. If you can afford one, get
yourself a Pen Friend. The thing is an ingenious piece of tech that I
use all the time.

Do you use Assisstive technology in your daily living?
All the time! Assistive tech is how I get through my life with any
degree of efficiency, especially at work and school. I use, among
other things, a screen reader, an electronic labeler, (pen friend),
multiple image recognition apps, a scanner, and my beloved Packmate
braille display (yes, I still live in the Middle Ages, sue me).

What piece of advice would you give to someone newly diagnosed? Or going
through a deterioration in vision / or mobility?
I don’t know what it would be like to lose or be about to lose your
sight, since I’ve never really had much of it myself. All I would say
is that it’s so important to reach out to others going through the
same things. The internet is full of support groups for every
imaginable struggle, and if you can’t find one, start one. I know it’s
cliched, but you’re never alone.
Any advice you’d like to give to a person with sight / no disabilities?
Assume we’re normal until told otherwise. Obviously there are some
differences, but I think you’ll find they matter far less than you
might imagine.
Did you seek out any specialist services / charities to help you and your
family deal with your situation?
I was diagnosed in infancy, so my parents sought out the CNIB to
provide some support. As I got older, I usually handled struggles
without tailored help, though the CNIB continued to provide occasional
guidance as I grew. Today, I’m almost entirely independent of
designated charities and the like, but I do know when to ask for
help–something it took me a long time to learn.

Where can people find you out in the world?
🙂
When I’m not being featured on the excellent blogs of others, I can be
found on my own blog (wheresyourdog.wordpress.com) where I write about
advocacy, education, and diversity, among other things. There’s even a
post about how horrible mosquitoes are; it’s definitely a riot. You
can follow me on twitter (@MeaganHHoule), where I share things that
make me laugh, cry, and think. You can also witness my addiction to
literature on Goodreads
(https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/27630033-meagan-houle). Add me so
I can fall in love with the same books you do!

Anything you’d like to add my lovely?

Thank you so much for taking the time to read about me and my dubious wisdom.
If you take nothing else away from what I’ve said today, just remember
to follow this blogger’s example and ask lots of questions (after
checking that they’re nice, polite questions, that is). We all need to
know how much we don’t know. Knowing how much you don’t know is half
the battle…or something. Now, get out there and (respectfully)
pester some folks!




Thank you Meagan for your fabulous answers! Not only did I see yet another great prespective of how you live your life as a person with a disability, but you embraced it with such humour and pazazz! I love your writing style, it’s unique and amusing; certainly puts my ramblings to shame! 🙂

Please don’t forget to follow her links, and why not share the love? Leave her a comment, we would both appreciate it!

If you or anyone you know would like to take part in my Campaign, do not hesitate to contact me on the following:
Email:SassysWorld6@gmail.com
Twitter
Facebook

If you enjoyed this interview why not check out the others in the series so far?
Interview 1
Interview 2
Interview 3

You are most welcome to subscribe to my mailing list so you do not miss any future interviews. For that I would be most grateful! 🙂

Thank you once again Meagan, it was lovely to interview and find out more about you as a person!




I hope you enjoyed this interview as much as I did?

Until next time wonderful people!

Much love, Sassy x

Happy Diaries #3

Well hello diary, it’s been a while!

I’ve had a busy month really; nearly 3 weeks of that was being rather unwell, which you can read Here. On a brighter note I have been pretty busy these past 2 weeks. I have been part of a movement in creating a new charity/ club in my local area, so fingers crossed we get more people coming along! 🙂
I had my first Spanish lesson in a few weeks due to illness as I mentioned above and the lesson was very productive and enjoyable, it was also nice to see my teacher again, as she is just such a lovely lady! 🙂

On the blogging front I am very excited and happy, things seem to be moving forward with gaining more people for my campaign, I have managed to secure 3 people to guest post; which I am so grateful for and excited for others to read!

I was also nominated for Leibster award and the VIP Tag I certainly enjoyed filling out the questions, and nominating others.
The Leibster Award recognises new bloggers and gives them a shout out to help boost their presence within the blogging community; as well as discovering more fantastic blogs to read!
The VIP Daily Living Tag, is a post created to ask visually impaired people questions about how they do daily tasks such as organising clothes, and what useful apps they use. It’s run by 2 lovely women, who like me, hope to raise awareness of disability!

I also wrote a post last week expressing my opinion on being an inspiration to others;I received a lovely response from friends,, family and bloggers alike 🙂 I entwined this with nominations for the Brilliance in Blogging Awards. They are still open, so you know, if you love me, you’ll vote for me in the inspire category 😉

Friendships have been developing and blossoming online over these past few weeks, isn’t it funny how at one time, all friendships started with a hello from a stranger,,,
The Tribe that i’m a part of has really lifted my spirits, we are all supporting each other on this blogging journey, and it’s great because not only do we share tips and content, but a solid foundation is forming and we are really becoming friends! It’s just a pity we are all at separate parts of the country!

I have also been talking to a few people online, and our friendships’ are flourishing too!
*I’ve justrealised i’ve been using a lot of Spring – like adjectives in this post.*

Although I have explained how productive my week has been I think i’m going to include a little gratitude list at the end of the week, just to round up, and remind me why I was particularly grateful for those specific things.

Gary, – my blogging life wouldn’t be possible if it wasn’t for him!
* Tea – Tea makes me warm inside and is a comfort to me.
* Cake – Cake, cake, cake, cake, cake; unless you’re allergic to eggs, who doesn’t love cake?
*My Tribe – You Tribesters are amazing and never fail to make me smile!
Friendships – Friendships in general, the old, that I am forever grateful for, and the new ones I am forming.
*My iPhone – Not only does it give me a chance to communicate with the outside world, because of it’s amazing Voice-Over software, but the cool things it does: such as shortcuts!
*The internet – i’m grateful for you Mr Internet; withoutyou I wouldn’t be blogging, making new friends, and listening to great songs:)
* RNLI – The most important one of all! I’m not going to going to very much detail here, but all I can say is without the emergency services of the coastguards, things could be very very different right now!




I hope you have had a good few weeks, and I look forward to checking in with you on a more regular basis!

Much love, Sassy

Things I Miss

It’s been just over 2 years since I lost my remaining useable vision, and although I have accepted what has happened to me, and know that there is nothing medically that the Hospital can do to change it, I still have moments or fleeting thoughts of things I miss from being sighted, and in turn blind but with some useable vision. This isn’t a pity party, or a moment of feeling down, I am just wanting to put my thoughts into writing, and in doing so, expressing that it’s OK to miss what you had, or have moments where you feel; “If I had a bit more sight…” or “I miss being able to see…” letting others know it’s OK to have those thoughts or feelings, as long as you don’t dwell on them. No matter how hard it is, humans are wired to adapt, and not allowing a disability run your life is what is important.
Here is a list of things I miss most about not having sight or useable vision.

Being able to see family/ friends/ meeting new people.
I miss this because I want to see the physical changes in my family: seeing what my nieces’ and Nephews’ look like as they grow older. What my friends’ look like on their wedding day, and see them beaming with happiness on their special day.

Colours:
I loved colours, the brighter the better. I miss it especially when i’m shopping as I have to rely on my partner or other people to describe the colour, and preferably the specific shade, so I can then get a better perspective. I still feel like there have been times that I’ve bought something I may not have particularly liked; If I had seen it with my own eyes I would have not chosen that particular item as I didn’t like the specific shade. But as i have to rely on others explanations, if they say the colour suited me(and I liked the material) then I would buy the item.

/ Sunrise/ Sunset:
I have always adored the colours as you watch The Sun rise or set, and i do think this relates majorly to my love of bright colours. And in the grand scheme of things it’s probably not that important, but strangely, after the list above, it was one of the main things I felt sad about not being able to see again.

Steps:
As strange as it sounds I miss seeing steps mostly because of the practicality of being safe, as my arthritis is extremely prevalent in my knees and ankles, i’ve always found steps strenuous, and being unsteady on my feet puts that extra bit of strain and stress into my day. Train gaps are probably the things I still stress about, and in some ways i’m glad i’m still vigilant with being on edge, as only a week ago I nearly fell down the gap trying to get onto the train, because a friend tried to hold my hand and get me on, but because I wasn’t ready, and not holding a handle, I couldn’t judge the distance of the gap and my foot went down the gap, thankfully as he was holding my hand I wouldn’t have actually fallen but my heart did jump into my mouth at that point.

Reading:
I would love to pick up a book and read it, as there is nothing better than to physically hold a book in my opinion, but as my sight had deteriorated quite a lot, I had been using the Kindle App to read books for atleast 2 years before my remaining vision went, and this is where my bug bare starts. Speech cannot discriminate between the words read / read, or wind / wind, and continuously says the word only one way, even when it’s literary meaning is the other one. But most frustratingly and most importantly is that it does not pronounce made up words properly, for example, Harry Potter is one of my most loved book collections, and I refuse to buy them on the Kindle App because VoiceOver/ speech cannot say half of the words properly! Slytherin is pronounced SLYTH There IN.
If you read books using speech you’ll understand my pain!

People watching:
This probably sounds terrible, but I loved walking through town and watching all the people in their own little worlds’ doing their own thing. People watching in a restaurant or Cafe is particularly enjoyable.
I’m lucky that my partner, and Sister love to people watch so I get audio descriptions of what’s going on around me, but i miss being nosey and see what people are wearing; especially if it’s a woman in her Pyjamas, Ugg Boots and her hair in rollers out in public!

Take off and landing at an Airport:
I loved watching planes come in and taking off when I was in the Airport waiting for my flight, but specifically I loved being on a plane staring out the window, having a birds eye view of what was below me, watching it shrink away the higher and higher we climbed. Landing/ taking off at night was always quite exciting as it was truly pretty seeing the landscape lit up with all the lights, and they always looked liked they were twinkling when you got further away.

Being able to see my food on my plate:
I can pretty much see a blob of contrasting colour on my plate when I eat my dinner, and it is annoying not knowing where food is on my plate. but mostly I despise having to chase the last few bits of food around my plate, I seem to miss it completely, and when I finally win the battle of finding it, I put it on my fork and it just seems to leap back off my fork onto the plate.
Food is a stressor for me, not only because of what i’ve explained above, but because I don’t like to touch my food and make my hands dirty, but because I hate chasing my food knowing people are watching, and i’m the typical blind child making a fool of myself!

Photographs:
Looking at photographs, old, and new. I miss being able to see what my family or friends look like in pictures on FaceBook, but I also really don’t like having my picture taken anymore because i don’t know what I look like, and if i’m looking directly at the camera. I can see the flash but if i’m not looking dead straight, the light can bounce off my eyes and make it look as if I cannot see.. This seemed to happen a lot even before my sight went fully,, and I would look back at the picture always looking slightly off centre,, even when I could see the camera and looked directly at it. So it’s given me a complex about having my photo taken now.

Not knowing where people are in the room:
I do listen out and figure out by the sound of their voice as to where a person is in retrospect to me, but i’m talking more specifically about when they move or try and hand me things. I’ve noticed this particularly in the last 6 months, my Niece is 15 months old, and doesn’t understand I cannot see her, and i can’t judge where she is if she doesn’t make a noise. She’s at a stage where she likes to share everything with you, and tries to hand me/ feed me food, and has managed to poke me in the eye or face as she’s doing so. Which can be quite uncomfortable as well as a shock if i’m not expecting it. I don’t want to stop interacting with her or not share with her, but as she isn’t fully talking she isn’t giving me a verbal cue, and therefore giving me time to react and interact.

So there we have it, the things I miss most about being sighted. As I said previously this isn’t a “down day” but I just wanted to put my thoughts out there, to let others know it’s completely acceptable to miss the little things that matter to you as an individual. I am also very fortunate that I have an extremely supportive network of family and friends, and although I miss these things, I know I’m blessed that I have their love kindness, and understanding, better yet, they laugh along with me when I make a blind faux par, and don’t make me feel uncomfortable about making mistakes.
I also know that in this day and age blind people are extremely lucky that we have access to brilliant technology, peer support groups, and public general knowledge so it makes our lives run a little more smoothly.
Although I have put these down as things I miss, in the grand scheme of my life they are of little significance and not something I dwell on. I’m extremely grateful for what, and, who I have in my life, and in a lot of ways I know I wouldn’t be the person I am today without going through the trials and tribulations of having a disability.

If you have anything you’d like to share, things you miss due to having a disability, write below, i’d love to read them 🙂

Thank you for reading you lovely lot!

Much Love, Sassy x

Reflections

As it’s the last day of the year I thought it apt to reflect on this past year. There have been many ups and downs, and although sometimes the bad times have felt awful, I believe there’s always something we can look back on, be grateful for and see what we’ve achieved or succeeded in. I definitely feel that without lows in life you can’t appreciate fully what you’ve got, and who you’ve got in your life. I can certainly say without a shadow of a doubt this year wouldn’t have been what it was without friends, family, and most importantly my partner Gary. He’s picked me up, dusted me off and made me laugh, even when i’ve refused to smile for anything else.
I thought I was going back to University to continue with my education only to find out that the Uni have graded and failed me for the exams I couldn’t take due to medical reasons (which they were made aware of this). I became pretty angry, and extremely sad throughout most of the year,and was finally diagnosed with depression in September.I also lost my Pops in September due to a chronic illness.
So as you can see i’ve not had the easiest of years, and unfortunately that’s taken a toll on my ever loving partner, i’m without words trying to explain just how much he means to me, and grateful he stuck through thick and thin with me this year, as I don’t know how I would have coped without that comfort and protection.

In honour of my Pops, and trying to look on the brighter side of life i’ve composed a list of my most favourable achievements, moments and memories of this year…

Here are just some of this years highlights:
I skied for the first time without sight; it was stressful, tiring, confusing, and exhilarating all at the same time. I haven’t done it since but I might consider giving it a go in the new year!

Gary and I became a grown up couple; he moved in with me!

Gary and I went to see Jimmy Carr live for the first time together; it was a birthday gift from him 🙂

Gary and I went to Edinburgh to visit my family, and we included lots of touristy things in our plans, it was so fun 🙂

I organised a mini surprise gathering for Gary’s birthday with 2 of our closest friends; we went out for a meal and drinks, and Gary and I ate 5 ghost chilli chicken wings as a challenge to one another, we were both crying afterwards but we did it!

We visited my family home in Cornwall and I showed Gary the beauty of my area doing lots of tourist things together 🙂

My best friend got married, and Gary and I went to the wedding 🙂 it was a truly beautiful day, and the bride looked absolutely gorgeous!

3 of my closest friends had their first child; these girls have all played a special part in my life and are more like sisters to me. I’m beyond happy for them all and their bundles of joy!

One of my best friends got engaged! Can’t wait for the wedding next year!!

I spent quality time with friends I don’t see regularly, 2 of them come from Canada, and were in the UK visiting / moving here!

I became better friends with the ones I made the year before 🙂

I became a volunteer for a local charity working with adults, children and their families who have visual impairments 🙂

I finally learnt how to use my Macbook! And currently learning how to use NVDA 🙂

Gary graduated University with a 2:1 – I couldn’t have been more proud!

Gary and I went on our first abroad holiday together, hot weather and brilliant memories made!

I went to Alton Towers for the first time with Gary, his Mum and a bunch of his friends, one of the best days I’d had all year.
Gary and I also went to Thorpe Park with 2 of our good friends, and I managed to encourage my friend to go on 2 rides she hadn’t ever been on, I was proud of my persuasive skills, but more proud of my friend for facing her fears and enjoying herself 🙂

Gary and I went to West Midlands Safari Park with his family, it was great to see our Neice and Nephews’ reactions to seeing and feeding the animals. Unfortunately I nearly got my hand pecked off by an Ostrich and Gary had a very close call with a greedy camel and stealing the box of pellets from in between his legs!

I joined the gym! A great feat for me, I always thought it would be a waste of money with me having such severe arthritis, and being unable to use any machines, fortunately I had Gary and our friend (also a personal trainer),to support me and start me on a very easy going work out plan 🙂

Gary and I went to Blackpool for the day with his family; it was wet, windy and really nothing to write home about, but I loved the day because we had such a laugh spending quality time together 🙂

I started this Blog! A massive achievement for me, because I hope that the knowledge I have of Disabilities, and Visual Impairment in general, can be used to help educate and connect people with one another! 🙂

Gary and I celebrated our 1st anniversary together; he surprised me with Champagne, roses and then took me out to dinner 🙂

Gary and I spent Christmas together with my family in Scotland, it was a double bonus as I celebrated it with my parents, Sister, Grandparents on both sides and of course my partner! Lots of laughter and mick taking out of one another, just how my family like it!

Tonight we’re off to Celebrate New Years Eve with Gary’s family, I cannot wait, Champagne and lots of laughter will definitely be on the cards, what a brilliant way to end such a brilliant year 🙂




I hope that however you spend your New Years Eve it’ll be full of fun, laughter and love! I shall be raising a glass to my wonderful Pops.

Here’s to you and your family; I hope 2015 was a good year for you, and 2016 is an unforgettable one, for all the right reasons!
Happy New Year to you all!

Much love, Sassy x