This new segment of my blog is a way of raising awareness of the variety of visual impairments and disabilities, that there are in the world. It will be posted on the 1st of every month. I have sourced several lovely volunteers who have offered to share their experiences and knowledge of their disability.

 

The First Instalment of this segment comes from Mark.

 

Tell me a bit about yourself…

I’m Mark Wright, 27, and live in Hertfordshire England. I work part time as an admin.
My Hobbies include : sports, radio, socialising and social media.

Now we know the basics, can we learn a bit more about you?

What is the medical reason you have a disability?
Registered blind.

Have you had your Visual impairment / disability from birth?
No, aged 16.

Which terminology do you prefer: Partially Sighted, Visually Impaired, Sight Impaired, Severely Sight Impaired or Blind?
blind.

Do you have a cane, Guide Dog or neither?
Long white cane.

If you could extinguish your disability, would you? – If not, please explain why.
Yes i would love my sight back.

For those who do not know much about your VI what can you see?
very little only peripheral vision left no central vision.

How has your disability effected you?
Socially lack of confidence when in a crowd of people find it tricky to assert myself at times body Language hard to read etc,
Physically none.
Mentally have good days and bad can be terribly frustrating trying to do simple things.

Do you think your disability has made you who you are today?
Probably i’ve had to come out of my shell a bit to get the help and support i’ve needed to cope in life.

Is there a particular question you get asked often because of your disability?
How much can you see?
Do you want a Guide Dog?
Is there any chance you might get your sight back?

What are the positives of having a disability?
Close community of people who instantly understand where you’re coming from.

What are the negatives of having a disability?
Social stigma the media and governments line on disabled people being scroungers even if we’re not.

What would you say is a difficulty for you being VI / disabled?
dating as a person with a disability.

What are the things you face on a daily / weekly basis that frustrate you?
At home i find cooking tricky measuring amounts of items, and out and about i’d say cars parked on pavements and street furniture being in awkward places.

Are there any tips or tricks you use in daily life you’d like to pass on to another VI/ disabled person?
defo get a note detector; this has most likely saved me being short changed many a time now.

Do you use Assistive technology in your daily living?
jaws for windows on my PC and i phone with voice over on.
What piece of advice would you give to someone newly diagnosed? Or going through a deterioration in vision / or mobility?

What you are feeling right now is completely understandable and no one is blaming you for feeling down. But there is help and supportive people out there its just finding it

Any advice you’d like to give to a person with sight / no disabilities?

treat us normally: ask us what we’d need, if anything. If not, respect our wishes.

Did you seek out any specialist services / charities to help you and your family deal with your situation?

I attended the Royal National College for the Blind in Hereford, i also attend a social group ran by Hertfordshire society for the blind called: Sight Life, in Wellen Garden City every week.
Where can people find you out in the world?

Blog: http://www.markwrightuk88.blogspot.com
FaceBook: http://www.facebook.com/markwrightuk88
Twitter: www.twitter.com/markwrightuk88

Anything you’d like to add my lovely?

Always happy to meet and chat to anyone who wishes to talk, talking is very important to support each other in hard times.

* * * * * * *




Thank you so much Mark, for being my first willing victim 😉 I hope it wasn’t too torturous!
Thank you for sharing your story with us, it was interesting to read, and insightful also 🙂
Please do not forget to check out Mark on his social media platforms above!! ^^^

If you would like to take part in the Disability Q&A Interview you can find me on

Twitter: @SassyWyatt use the #DisabilityQ&A

Facebook: Thinking Out Loud Blog – Leave me a PM

Email: SassysWorld6@gmail.com

And i’ll be sure to get back to you 🙂
Don’t forget to keep an eye out every 1st and 15th of the Month to hear a/read the newest interview!
Subscribe, share and comment – Mark deserves your love too!

Much love, Sassy x

10 comments on “Disability Q&A Interview #1 Mark Wright”

  1. I think this is a great series lovely. It’s good to get an insight of the person behind the disability. I don’t currently have a disability, but I’m very nervous of saying the wrong thing or asking the wrong questions / using the wrong terminology. It helps to gain a better understanding,

    Mark – Lovely to “Meet” you and thank you for sharing.

    Dawn x
    #abitofeverything

    • Hey lovely lady,
      Thanks so much for your lovely comment 🙂 The most basic advice I can give would be don’t try and be to PC with your vocabulary 🙂 Hopefully as each month goes on you’ll be able to read that we don’t get offended too easily 🙂
      Take care xxx

  2. This is a great series. I have to admit I always wonder how much someone can see when they say they are blind. This is because of my experiences with people who are deaf, who sometimes still have a degree of hearing.
    Thanks for sharing with us, Tracey xx #abitofeverything

    • Hey Tracy,
      Some people like myself used the terminology because medically they may be registered as blind,mostly because it would be difficult to explain that I could see a bit, even if it wasn’t full sight when talking to a stranger 🙂
      Thanks for your comment xxx

  3. Wonderful interview! Not being able to read body language is something I hadn’t thought of before. That would be really difficult to get a vibe from people just from the tone of their voice. Thanks so much for linking up with #bloggerclubuk xx

    • Hey Becky,
      Yes body language was one of the main things I dreaded most in communication when I lost my last chunk of remaining vision, fortunately though, I’ve educated friends and family, and with strangers I listen a little harder, or don’t worry so much if I make a fool of myself haha 🙂 xxx

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